Easy Ego State Intervention Workshops

Dear Readers, Ego state work has been around since before Freud, and in latter years, has been the main stay of many practices. Interventions can range from "How old did you feel when you were yelling at your wife?" to "Let's identify those dissociative states that take over your body." I've been working with this

By |2018-04-16T12:30:12-07:00April 16th, 2018|Comments Off on Easy Ego State Intervention Workshops

Trauma Treatment Handbook: Protocols Across the Spectrum

My copy of the new book arrived today. Here is what Diana Fosha says about it:"This is a thorough, accessible, and very practical book, filled with resources and sound ideas, filtered through the intelligence and experience of a savvy, compassionate, down-to-earth, and very experienced clinician. It is like a travel guide to the land of

By |2010-08-17T19:22:38-07:00August 17th, 2010|5 Comments

GPS-Directed Socially-Engaged States

Two years ago. My husband and I drove up the California coast after the Lifespan Learning conference. We did it again after this year’s conference, with a remarkable difference, my skinny-nervous husband was rarely in hypermobilized vagal states on this trip. I blogged about the last trip, here: http://traumatherapy.typepad.com/trauma_attachment_therapy/2007/03/mobilization.html In 2007, every time we came

By |2009-03-14T07:51:44-07:00March 14th, 2009|3 Comments

UCLA Trauma Conference Synthesis

I escaped the conference yesterday, and am typing in the dark this morning beside my snoring husband. I can’t see my notes, so let me tell you my impression of the conference: Trauma impacts the right hemisphere of the brain. Helpful trauma therapy targets the right brain. Left brain cognitions and interpretations don’t have much

By |2009-03-09T08:59:53-07:00March 9th, 2009|7 Comments

UCLA Trauma Conference Day 2: Dan Siegel, Mindfulness

Daniel Siegel: A System's View of Disintegration & Integration (He's still cute, he's still brilliant, he speaks in easy-to-remember aphorisms and he's still heartful. What's not to like?) "Integration is the linking of differentiated parts. The concept is useful for assessment, tx planning and therapy. . .Presence is absent in trauma survivors. Presence begins with

By |2009-03-08T22:21:23-07:00March 8th, 2009|1 Comment

UCLA Trauma Conference 3/7/09 Day2: Porges

Stephen Porges, Demystifying the Mechanisms of Trauma: Maladaptive Consequences of Adapative Bio-Behavioral Reactions to Life Threat  Stephen Porges knows how to connect. I could listen to him talk all day.  I explain his Poly-vagal theory to every trauma client and every consultee. Today, after he answered a difficult question, in a most kind way, my

By |2009-03-07T21:47:02-08:00March 7th, 2009|2 Comments

UCLA 2009 Trauma Conference Day 1, van der Kolk & Shapiro

Day 1: Bessel van der Kolk is lovely. He's humble, he's funny, and he is the premiere researcher on the neurobiology and/or efficacy of trauma treatments in the world. And cute and brilliant, of course. Here are nearly random gems from 3 hours of notes: With trauma, there are no stories, only sensory experience: images,

By |2009-03-06T22:35:54-08:00March 6th, 2009|2 Comments

Babette Rothschild: The Body Remembers

The name of the workshop was "The Body Remembers: The Psychophysiology of Trauma and Trauma Treatment".  The main point was: therapists do too much trauma therapy too early and should do much more preparation before they do the "memory processing" and should often do no trauma processing at all. She talked alot about helping people

By |2009-01-31T18:04:25-08:00January 31st, 2009|Comments Off on Babette Rothschild: The Body Remembers

EMDR and Depression poster

I applied to the EMDR International Conference to lead a 3-hour workshop on Treating Depression with EMDR. I wrote four chapters about it in the new book, EMDR Solutions II, for Depression, Eating Disorders, Performance, & More. Instead of a workshop, I was invited to do a poster. I know how to write. I know

By |2008-09-10T08:17:55-07:00September 10th, 2008|2 Comments

MYSHRINK.COM

myshrink.com is a fantastic website/blog full of information about therapy, bodymind connection, anxiety, and depression. It has some of the most cogent explainations I've seen. It's a great resource for clients as well as therapists. It's written and overseen by Suzanne LaCombe, a therapist in Vancouver, BC. She writes clearly, has a sense of humor,

By |2007-11-14T07:32:48-08:00November 14th, 2007|Comments Off on MYSHRINK.COM

The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy

The book group discussed The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy by Louis Cozolino (W.W. Norton & Co. 2002). We liked it. Cozolino's book is easy to understand and moves along nicely. It is packed with information about the brain. Its case examples were great, though too few. Cozolino writes about brain structures--the triune brain (lizard, mammalian, human),

By |2007-11-09T21:04:29-08:00November 9th, 2007|2 Comments

The Neuroscience of Photographers’ Artistic Process

My husband, Doug Plummer, who is a wonderful professional photographer, interviewed me for a podcast about the neuroscience of "being in the zone" of taking good pictures. Given our interests, it's an ongoing discussion. Here's the podcast. It's about 15 minutes long, boiled down from about an hour. If you'd like to visit Doug's blogs

By |2007-11-09T18:09:22-08:00November 9th, 2007|Comments Off on The Neuroscience of Photographers’ Artistic Process
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