My History with Ego State Therapy

I wrote this as a prologue to the Greek version of Easy Ego State Interventions and realized that it will make a good post: I have been looking through the lenses of ego state therapies since 1981. During that year, my first out of graduate school, I took a course in Eric Berne’s Transactional Analysis

By |2019-05-16T10:52:12-07:00May 16th, 2019|0 Comments

Update and New Workshop

Dear Readers, (It appears that the many links in this post aren't working. You're going to have to drag and drop into your browser if you want to see anything online. Sorry!) It's been a busy year since I've posted anything. I blame Facebook and work in many other areas. Since my last book, Easy Ego State

By |2016-07-30T16:41:21-07:00July 30th, 2016|0 Comments

Penn State: Was the abuse too horrible to acknowledge?

Here are two similar views of the Penn State child abuse debacle. One from the anonymous humble2humble blog (obviously by a man of faith who understands child abuse): http://humble2humble.blogspot.com/2011_11_01_archive.html. The second is by David Brooks, from yesterday's NYT's: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/15/opinion/brooks-lets-all-feel-superior.html Both speak to the commonality of denial and avoidance. Both are great writing. What do you think?

By |2011-11-16T14:27:43-08:00November 16th, 2011|3 Comments

Beautifully written survivor blog

I stumbled on an interesting blog. What makes it unusual is that it's by a man, beautifully written, spiritually and religiously and literarilly informed. The writer deals with themes of shame, humility, power-over, abuse, right speech and right action. He's not sanctimonious at all. He seems to know whereby he speaks. The blog is anonymous.

By |2011-06-21T15:10:35-07:00June 21st, 2011|0 Comments

Trauma Treatment Handbook: Protocols Across the Spectrum

My copy of the new book arrived today. Here is what Diana Fosha says about it:"This is a thorough, accessible, and very practical book, filled with resources and sound ideas, filtered through the intelligence and experience of a savvy, compassionate, down-to-earth, and very experienced clinician. It is like a travel guide to the land of

By |2010-08-17T19:22:38-07:00August 17th, 2010|5 Comments

Why We Do Trauma Therapy

Here is the last paragraph of the Introduction to Trauma Treatments Handbook, Protocols Across the Spectrum. You're seeing it before the publishers do. Before I send it in, do you have anything to add about why we do this work? I'll publish what you write, unless it's spam.   As trauma therapists, we are privileged

By |2009-11-20T17:29:27-08:00November 20th, 2009|12 Comments

Lessons Learned While Writing A Book for Psychotherapists

I'm 13 chapters into writing Trauma Treatments Handbook, Across the Spectrum. Here's the advice I'd give anyone doing the same thing: Get a second screen for your computer. Keep the reference page, internet search materials, etc. open on the second screen. It will save you days of searching for the right open file. Start the

By |2009-09-07T20:28:46-07:00September 7th, 2009|5 Comments

Why I Love Doing Psychotherapy

I love doing therapy. I'm two weeks back from vacation and I've seen the whole caseload, from a brand new person to clients returning to treatment after years away, to people in the midst of the muck, and one person who is over her debilitating anxiety and done with the process. What do I love?

By |2008-07-10T21:50:05-07:00July 10th, 2008|8 Comments

Why Book Editing Is Like Doing Psychotherapy

The Book has a title now: EMDR Solutions II, for Depression, Eating Disorders, Performance and More. It has a cover photograph, too. and the photo has a story. (Full disclosure--the photographer is my husband.) See it and read it at http://www.dougplummer.com/archives/ireland2/fall9.html I'm in full-blown editing mode: going through each chapter, attaching a header, reformatting it,

By |2008-05-05T21:10:47-07:00May 5th, 2008|1 Comment

Writing a book

I've finished three and a half chapters. I'm giving myself until late April to finish three and a half more. The act of writing is getting easier as my mind slides easily into the "groove"; the neural avenues of "writing behavior" lengthen and widen and make thousands more connections. I no longer wake up at

By |2008-03-19T20:56:33-07:00March 19th, 2008|0 Comments